leave a trace - A People Tracking System Meets Anomaly Detection

arXiv paper
D. Rueß, K. Amplianitis, N. Deckers, M. Adduci, K. Manthey, R. Reulke
arXiv
Publication year: 2017

Abtract

Video surveillance always had a negative connotation, among others because of the loss of privacy and because it may not automatically increase public safety. If it was able to detect atypical (i.e. dangerous) situations in real time, autonomously and anonymously, this could change. A prerequisite for this is a reliable automatic detection of possibly dangerous situations from video data. This is done classically by object extraction and tracking. From the derived trajectories, we then want to determine dangerous situations by detecting atypical trajectories. However, due to ethical considerations it is better to develop such a system on data without people being threatened or even harmed, plus with having them know that there is such a tracking system installed. Another important point is that these situations do not occur very often in real, public CCTV areas and may be captured properly even less. In the artistic project leave a trace the tracked objects, people in an atrium of a institutional building, become actor and thus part of the installation. Visualisation in real-time allows interaction by these actors, which in turn creates many atypical interaction situations on which we can develop our situation detection. The data set has evolved over three years and hence, is huge. In this article we describe the tracking system and several approaches for the detection of atypical trajectories.

 

 

Inspiring Computer Vision System Solutions

arXiv paper
J. Zilly, A. Boyarski, M. Carvalho, A. A. Abarghouei, K. Amplianitis, A. Krasnov, M. Mancini, H. Gonzalez, R. Spezialetti, C. S. Pérez, H. Li
arXiv:1707.07210
Publication year: 2017

Abstract

The “digital Michelangelo project” was a seminal computer vision project in the early 2000’s that pushed the capabilities of acquisition systems and involved multiple people from diverse fields, many of whom are now leaders in industry and academia. Reviewing this project with modern eyes provides us with the opportunity to reflect on several issues, relevant now as then to the field of computer vision and research in general, that go beyond the technical aspects of the work.
This article was written in the context of a reading group competition at the week-long International Computer Vision Summer School 2017 (ICVSS) on Sicily, Italy. To deepen the participants understanding of computer vision and to foster a sense of community, various reading groups were tasked to highlight important lessons which may be learned from provided literature, going beyond the contents of the paper. This report is the winning entry of this guided discourse (Fig. 1). The authors closely examined the origins, fruits and most importantly lessons about research in general which may be distilled from the “digital Michelangelo project”. Discussions leading to this report were held within the group as well as with Hao Li, the group mentor.